Some More Thoughts on Relativity

I admit it, I’m a terrible blogger. At least I am when life happens. Which it kind of always does. Otherwise, I, you know, wouldn’t have one. But if I can’t keep up with a consistent posting schedule, the least I can do is follow up on a promised post. Unfortunately I haven’t done any of the math-work on the promised Special Relativity post (I’ve had enough school to do without calculating a new definition of motion), but I can update you on my discoveries about General Relativity.

As I mentioned in my last post (over two months ago…), I had a chance to talk to Korean physicist Min Seong Lee about my ideas on relativity, and what he had to say enlightened me in a few ways, both positive and negative.

First, it turns out that the problem I found in relativity is actually only a problem in the oversimplification of the theory that is used to explain it to high schoolers. To recap, my problem with the theory was that a simple warp in space time would cause particles to curve in observed space, but not at all in the way we see gravity behaving, and it would never accelerate a particle from a stationary position relative to the space-time. To solve this problem, I proposed that instead of mass warping space-time, space-time moves towards mass. What Min Seong pointed out to me is that, while a particle may be stationary relative to the three dimensions of space, no particle is ever stationary relative to time. Time is always flowing, providing the moving dimension that I proposed was necessary to create motion within space. I am still not sure entirely how this works, even though he showed me an equation that demonstrated how moving time acceleration (or if I did, I have forgotten my understanding in the months it has taken me to get this written down).

Now, the happy part of this is that, because of the moving time aspect and some of the math involved, my idea is basically just another way to say what already existed in the theory, so while I wasn’t the first to come up with this idea (though maybe the first to state it the way I did), my idea was, in fact, correct (or at least mostly so). While I may be merely following in the footsteps of minds greater than mine, it is still exciting to follow their footsteps with my own mind, rather than getting pushed along the path in a stroller. Textbooks are great for learning things, and I would never have been able to discover what I have without the foundation they gave me, but there is nothing like discovering cool science stuff for yourself.

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